October 2015
Telephone icon

We are a licensed state contracting service who has provided natural beauty at affordable prices for more than 30 years.

St. Lic. #620680

A & W Professional Gardening & Landscaping

Call for your FREE estimate!

Al's Hints & Tips

Welcome to our blog!

 

We love to give to our customers, and one way we can do that is by providing you with helpful tricks to maintain your yard!

October 2015

By Cheyenne Wiscovitch, Oct 26 2015 09:23PM

Happy Hallo-week!

How many of you are ready for the REAL October to get here?! Maybe there is no such thing as a real October since its Southern California. Well at least our favorite coffee houses are preparing us all sorts of yummy pumpkin treats to make us feel like its autumn!

Since it’s the month of October, I thought it would be appropriate to bring up the topic…Spiders! I definitely had a hard time doing research on these guys, since I am absolutely terrified of them. So I hope you enjoy all this spooky information I am about to present to you!

The first spider on our list is called Araneus Diadematus (Cross Orbweaver). Their size varies from 6-13 mm and is typically orange, brown, white and tan. They tend to roam around gardens, farms, and orchards during the summer and autumn season. The female spider lays an egg sack that contains 100-800 yellowish eggs. Unfortunately, she dies shortly after. These spiders are not picky about where they create their web, so they usually make it where they can. Then they eat it at night. Then in the morning they start the process all over again! Crazy!

The second one is called an Agelenopsis (Grass Spider). There are so many different types of this particular species; the size varies from 6-20 mm. Their colors are brown, tan, grey, and black. They mate during the summer to late autumn. They eat almost any type of insect that gets stuck inside their web. If they notice that the insect is too big or aggressive, it will retreat back to its “home base”, making this spider non-aggressive.

The third type of spider is called Argiope aurantia (Black and Yellow Garden Spider). It is black, yellow and brown. The female is 14-28 mm and the adult male is 5-8 mm. They tend to roam around gardens, orchards, forest edges, and old fields. They make an orb shaped web on ground level areas, such as grass and weeds. They eat their web every night and recreate it every day. These spiders will eat anything that’s in its web, even grasshoppers! Fun fact about this spider is it will shake itself in front of predators, so his body appears bigger than he really is.

The fourth type of spider is called Parasteatoda Tepidariorum (Common House Spider). His colors vary between black, brown, yellow, orange, and tan. The males are typically 5 mm and the females are typically 5-9 mm in length. These guys typically live for a year. They love to settle in the human territories. You could commonly find them in places like garages, sheds and other small places around the house. They create what is called an “intelligent web”. This means that he creates a trap line that is attached to the ground. So when his prey walks through it, he can feel the movement in his web and will attack his prey. The females will usually eat insects much larger than her. They are often mistaken for a cobweb spider.

The fifth type of spider is the Lactrodectus geometricus (Brown Widow). Dun, dun, dun…These guys sound like they would be just as poisonous as a black widow, but they are not. While they are to rabbits, and other small animals, they are not to humans. These spiders have lateral eyes that are completely separated from each other. They like to live in areas such as yards and gardens. Be sure to take extra caution with objects that have been sitting for a long time. They will eat almost anything that gets caught in its web. If you were to get caught in the web and accidently get bit…you should be able to still live! The bite spot will typically lead to some pain and swelling but that’s about it. People often confuse this spider for the Common House Spider mentioned above. Just keep your eye out for the hour glass on this guy’s back and the spiky egg sack that the spiderlings are growing inside of.


Featured SCARY SPIDER:

Here he is ladies and gentlemen…he’s tiny but mighty! This spider is called the Menemerus Bivittatus (Grey Wall Jumper). It comes in two colors-grey and black. This spider is typically found lurking on walls of a man made building hunting its prey during the day. In the hours of the night they are hiding, keeping themselves safe. They don’t spin a web, instead they like to jump and pounce on their prey. They have 2 claws at the end of their legs, which allows them to latch onto their prey, therefore, eliminating the need for a web. Their life span is usually 1 year.


I hope you enjoyed reading about some of our spiders that we get to share this great planet with! It was sure scary doing research on these guys, since every description contained a photo of them *shivers*. We hope that you are able to identify one of these guys if you ever encounter them!



Cross Orbweaver
Cross Orbweaver
Grass Spider
Grass Spider
Black and Yellow Garden Spider
Black and Yellow Garden Spider
Common House Spider
Common House Spider
Brown Widow
Brown Widow
Grey Wall Jumper
Grey Wall Jumper
Add a comment
* Required
RSS Feed

Web feed